Corporate Gifts: Engraved Wine Glasses vs. Imprinted Wine Glasses

Wine Glasses 101: Part 1 of 2
Over the years CEShoppes has worked very hard to become a premier provider of decorated wine glasses. As part of this endeavor we have provided decorated stemware to clients for all manners and scales of events. Needless to say we get a lot of questions involving the etiquette and best methods of decorating wine glasses. This is a short intro to using wine glasses for events and as corporate gifts.

Types of Decorating Wine Glasses and Decanters:
Traditionally wine glasses have been engraved with monograms, commemorative date and names, such as weddings and anniversaries and more recently corporate logos. Wine glass engraving or 'etching' is accomplished by covering the glass with a 'mask' or 'film pattern', then 'sand is 'blown'" against the surface. Wherever the glass is not protected by the masked pattern, it becomes "etched" or engraved where the sand strikes the surface. This procedure is different than metal etching techniques where the surface is covered with wax or resin, a design scratched into it and the material immersed into acid. The third method of glass etching is actually a form of engraving. The operator imprints the pattern or design on glass with a high speed drill and uses a fine, steel bit to engrave the decoration or text. The drill can be used freehand, but is usually done with the aid of a stencil guide in order to trace over a pattern or design.

Wine glasses normally are 'engraved' when the value of the glass is above $5.00 and in smaller quantities or as special gifts. Wine glasses can also be imprinted with ink and is a less expensive method of decoration, which is why it is used for less expensive stemware and when it is necessary to decorate a large number of glasses with an identical logo or message. It is important to note that most commercial stemware decorators have a special color ink that is used for imprinting stemware to 'look' like it is engraved or 'frosted'. This method is very popular for decorating stemware for events and gives the stemware an upscale look. Because the process is priced per color it also allows the wine glass to be decorated on both sides at no extra charge, one for the event name and the other side for a date or sponsor logo or name. This process is called 'satin imprinting' or 'satin etch', even though it is not actually etching or engraving the wine glasses.

 

Next Installment: Part 2 of 2 - Why the proper shape of the glass makes drinking wine more pleasurable.